Roughly two months after the Centers for Disease Control issued a public health alert in connection with frozen chicken products manufactured by Serenade Foods, the company is officially recalling five different brands of the product, equalling nearly 60,000 pounds, two of which are sold in Aldi's grocery stores nationwide.

The recall, issued by the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS), states they had received 28 reports of salmonella-related illness from eight different states between February 21st and June 28th. Unopened packages of Serenade Foods' raw, frozen, breaded chicken stuffed with broccoli and cheese were collected and tested from the homes of those who had reported feeling ill and came back positive for a strain of the bacteria known as Salmonella Enteritidis.

The recall includes the following product lines:

  • 5-oz individually plastic-wrapped packages of “Dutch Farms Chicken with Broccoli & Cheese” with lot code BR 1055 and BEST IF USED BY FEB 24 2023.
  • 5-oz individually plastic-wrapped packages of “MILFORD VALLEY CHICKEN WTH BROCCOLI & CHEESE” with lot code BR 1055 and BEST IF USED BY FEB 24 2023.
  • 10-oz box of two individually plastic-wrapped packages of “MILFORD VALLEY CHICKEN CORDON BLEU” with lot code CB 1055 and BEST IF USED BY FEB 24 2023.
  • 5-oz individually plastic-wrapped packages of “KIRKWOOD Raw Stuffed CHICKEN, BROCCOLI & CHEESE” with lot code BR 1055 and BEST IF USED BY FEB 24 2023.
  • 5-oz individually plastic-wrapped packages of “KIRKWOOD Raw Stuffed CHICKEN CORDON BLEU” with lot code CB 1056 and BEST IF USED BY FEB 25 2023.

While the recall noted the products listed above were distributed to retailers nationwide, it did not specify any of those retailers by name. USA Today reports the Kirkwood line is sold at Aldi locations nationwide, which could include the two Evansville locations, as well as the Owensboro location.

According to the USDA, symptoms of salmonella-induced illness include, " diarrhea, abdominal cramps, and fever within 12 to 72 hours after eating the contaminated product" which can last anywhere between four to seven days. With that said, they also note that "diarrhea may be so severe the patient needs to be hospitalized," and "older adults, infants, and persons with weakened immune systems are more likely to develop a severe illness."

Take a look at the product labels and if you have any of these products in your freezer, do not eat them (obviously). Take them back to where you purchased them for a refund.

[Souce: United States Department of Agriculture / USA Today]

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