What do you think a kid would say is the best job in the whole world? They might say a police officer or firefighter, or maybe an astronaut or a professional athlete, right? I gotta think that somewhere near the top of that list is the job of being the boss at a children's museum. Imagine being a youngster that's in charge of all the fun stuff at the Children's Museum of Evansville (cMoe). How cool would that be?

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For the fifth year in a row, the Children's Museum of Evansville is looking for its next Kid CEO for a Day. The 'hiring' process has already begun and cMoe is currently accepting 'resumes' from potential CEO candidates - kids between the ages of 8 and 12 years old.

How to Apply for the Kid CEO Position

  • Wannabe CEOs need to put together a video 'resume'. Get involved and make it a family project.
  • The video should show off your personality and some of your basic information - your first name, your age, what grade you're in, and what school you go to - and tell cMoe about some of your favorite hobbies.
  • Your video should also include your favorite thing about cMoe, and one improvement you would like to make to the museum.
  • And, of course, cMoe wants to know why you think you would make a great CEO.
  • Once your video is ready, you can upload it to info@cmoekids.org. You need to do this by August 31, 2021.

What Does the Kid CEO Get to Do?

I figured we'd bring in Mr. Know-It-All when it comes to all things related to cMoe - he's the museum's Marketing & Communications Manager - to tell us more about the job responsibilities, perks, and benefits of being the Kid CEO for a Day.

cMoe's Clay Prindle Talks Kid CEO Contest

EVANSVILLE TOYS AND GAMES SUPER AMAZING COLLECTABLES

See this collection of toys from the ’70s, ’80s, ’90s, 00’s, up to today. Evansville Toys & Games also has video games, comic books, Pokémon cards, movies, and more. G.I. Joe, WWE, Transformers, Ninja Turtles, Power Rangers, Star Wars, Marvel and it's all for sale.

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