Now, before you make a mad rush to the grocery store to stock up on the bread and milk, it's important to note that the phrase "blizzard conditions" refers to a combination of strong winds, cold and snow. It doesn't necessarily indicate large snowfall amounts.  It does, however, suggest really unpleasant conditions, some issues with visibility and we just may have all that Thursday evening into Friday here in the Tristate.

Earlier this morning, Eyewitness New Meteorologist Ron Rhodes mentioned that we could see wind gusts in excess of 30 mph later this week.  He also mentioned that he's been looking at two different forecast models, both of which are predicting snow.  Here's what those models are saying.

Now, I searched a few other forecasting sites and it's AccuWeather who dropped the words "blizzard conditions."  Here's a look at their current forecast for Thursday night.

AccuWeather
AccuWeather
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Nope! That's no photoshopped. That's not a typo. That's for real.

Of course, I suppose the good news is that 1.2 inches of predicted snow isn't all that bad. That's certainly not the 3 to 6 inches one of Ron's forecast models is suggesting.

By the way, The Weather Channel seems to be in line with Ron's other model.  They're calling for 1 to 3 inches of snow after the rain transitions.

The Weather Channel
The Weather Channel
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The National Weather Service has shared its forecast as well and the wind gusts projected are just insane.

National Weather Service
National Weather Service
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Yeah, you're reading that correctly! Wind gusts up to 45 mph on Friday. If it's snowing when those gusts occur and the temperature plummets, we are certainly going to have "blizzard conditions."

Now, as you know, weather (and forecasts) in this part of the country can change on a dime, so we'll see how this plays out. Of course, we'll keep monitoring the situation and you can stay up-to-date and receive alerts through our station app.

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LOOK: The most extreme temperatures in the history of every state

Stacker consulted 2021 data from the NOAA's State Climate Extremes Committee (SCEC) to illustrate the hottest and coldest temperatures ever recorded in each state. Each slide also reveals the all-time highest 24-hour precipitation record and all-time highest 24-hour snowfall.

Keep reading to find out individual state records in alphabetical order.

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